Is Finishing High School Still Important?


In Australia the legal age to drop out of high school is 17 years old. Do you think the age should be raised? Or should teenagers be able to choose when they leave school? Do you think finishing high school is important? Or is starting work young better? Share your answers below.

Posted by on 16 Apr 2018

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  • [0] [0]
    Laylow

    Of course! Your future relys on it These days you need a pass of high school to get into what you want in life

    Posted by Laylow on 19 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Angelique

    I think the completion of High School is the basic foundation for finding a job in the future. You should teach your kids dedication and staying power from a young age - that they should complete something they start. They have many years ahead of them from 18 onwards to find out what they want to do, and what industry they want to work in. Even most apprentices start at 18 in the current environment.

    Posted by Angelique on 19 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Karen

    Absolutely. The world is changing expedentially. So will the jobs of the future.

    Posted by Karen on 18 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    joanne

    I think it depends on the individual child. Children develope, mature diffently. Staying in school might benefit one child where as another child will benefit more if they find an apprenticeship or become.e a trainee.

    Posted by joanne on 18 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Shirley

    Yes if you want to get a good job

    Posted by Shirley on 18 Apr 2018

  • [1] [0]
    vegandelight

    Come to think of it, didn't some of the greatest geniuses of our time fail to complete high school (which didn't go up to year 12 in those days)? A lot of great politicians, well-remembered statesmen, successful businessmen in charge of corporations & cartels all failed to complete high school. Children should experience working both alone & together both without & with pay for the benefit of the common good or for the family to start with.

    Posted by vegandelight on 18 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Glen1

    Definitely important. In fact, I wish I went to Uni to have more of a selection of jobs.

    Posted by Glen1 on 18 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Beryl J

    I am 79 years old now,& left school in year 11, probably regretted not finishing for science as I always wanted to be a biological chemist,tried to get my leaving certificate some years later,but by then I had married & had a successful office career, & with no Qualifications ended up as Corporate Accountant in a large manufacturing company. So it was not so important in those days,but in todays climate the knowledge you gain by staying in school & perhaps going on to University counts for much more.

    Posted by Beryl J on 18 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Sean

    They should be strongly advised by their peer group members that it is VITAL they complete school. Otherwise they WILL find themselves at a severe "disadvantage in life". And......ditto...........re completing high school. This WILL present them with many "great advantages in life".

    Posted by Sean on 18 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Pompey69

    I think the age is about right. However some people are far better at creative or manual work. Staying maybe a problem and they could become distracted and confused about education. There needs to be better apprenticeship schemes as well,where the apprentice actually learns doesn’t become disheartened and isn’t just a cheap alternative to hiring a labourer

    Posted by Pompey69 on 18 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Alda

    I came across many Australians who dropped of the hight school earlier then age 17

    Posted by Alda on 18 Apr 2018

  • [1] [0]
    SAScorpion

    As long as they are involved in other forms of education and/or in employment to ensure they have a viable future for themselves there id no problem with leaving high school. Looking after your future is the most important decision for all teenagers to make to prepare for their future and continuing in high school is not always the best option for some people to prepare for life in the real world.

    Posted by SAScorpion on 18 Apr 2018

  • [1] [0]
    Kylie

    In my opinion, being motivated is important!! I dont think it matters if you complete high school, complete university or drop out and obtain an apprenticeship/traineeship. As long as you are being proactive and have a goal then thats whats important.

    Posted by Kylie on 17 Apr 2018

  • [1] [0]
    Julie

    If the person dropping out has an apprenticeship or military position I feel it is a positive move or a traineeship if they are dropping out to be unemployed no. If the person is creating havoc in the classroom they should be taken out & given community service duties till they learn respect then sent back to school the following year

    Posted by Julie on 17 Apr 2018

  • [1] [0]
    Jo

    Yes i do believe so every child deserves an education,encourage the child to complete their high school years.Its not just about grades,better jobs its also about character,bettering them selves for their future

    Posted by Jo on 17 Apr 2018

  • [3] [0]
    Aurora

    The most important thing in a persons life is a good education. Without this, how can anyone expect to be employed?? Employers don't give jobs to people with poor reading, writing & maths skills. They are the basics for survival, yet we see more and more young people who cannot read, write, construct a meaningful sentence, understand written instructions, and even worse cannot add, subtract, multiply or divide. It is not the fault of teachers, it is the fault of the individual who has been raised to believe that everything will come to them without their doing anything to earn it. A sense of entitlement if you will. They make the decision that their cell phones are more important than learning and just switch off. Personally, I would like to get all the cell phones and put them on a rocket to outer space. They are a diabolical nuisance. You don't get a job to sit or stand using a cell phone 8 hrs a day. The boss does expect you to do some work.

    Posted by Aurora on 17 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Mustang6000

    Yes, it is very important. I understand that a lot of young people are not suited to go onto tertiary education, however yrs 11 & 12 are still important enough in rounding out their education and giving them a better grounding to make decisions on their futures. I also believe that TAFE colleges are an excellent route for those not academically inclined, but still enable them to further their educations.

    Posted by Mustang6000 on 17 Apr 2018

  • [1] [1]
    musicveg

    My 17 year old has been homeschooling and I am encouraging him to keep studying, he will hopefully decide what direction he wants to go for work in a couple of years. He is talking about doing some online courses or Tafe, but not interested in University and we cannot afford it anyway. Living in the country you have way too many expenses to get a child to university. There should be more free education available so everyone gets a chance, not just the rich.

    Posted by musicveg on 17 Apr 2018

  • [1] [0]
    Karen

    Entirely depends on the individual. We are all wired differently.

    Posted by Karen on 16 Apr 2018

  • [2] [0]
    vegandelight

    That depends. On one hand, we have an outdated & unworkable education system that needs a massive overhaul, even by international standards. We have actually gone a long way backwards. To further define terms, it isn't called Year 12 any more, as others, not the topic, have stated. However, on the other hand, wages at a young age are not so attractive, unless you want a lifetime career in the military. Some of us worked before & after finishing high school, don't forget! And I thought the school leaving age differed between the states. However, students should have a complete & thorough general education before either starting work or continuing to higher education. Again, this argument boils down to a question of finance, so I continue to press the point that All Education Must be free, just as it used to be & wages Must be high to reflect a portion of company profits & improve our standard of living.

    Posted by vegandelight on 16 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Fred17

    Yes, with the proviso that some kids would be better suited to trade courses and they should take subjects which reflect that progression in Years 11 & 12. All, or at least most kids should complete Yr12. I left school aged 15 after Yr10 and have always regretted it (not that I had any say in the matter). Now working on degrees nos 4&5 :) Far too many kids are heading off to university when they don't have basic numeracy and literacy so I don't know what they're learning in Yrs11&12. Maybe they simply don't belong at university. Then there are all the weirdo subjects at uni, like "gender studies" which basically prepare students to be social activists and gender studies teachers.

    Posted by Fred17 on 16 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Danon

    but yes we should go kindy to year 12 live our lives

    Posted by Danon on 16 Apr 2018

  • [0] [3]
    Danon

    A secondary school is both an organization that provides secondary education and the building where this takes place. Some secondary schools can provide both lower secondary education and upper secondary education (levels 2 and 3 of the ISCED scale), but these can also be provided in separate schools, as in the American middle school- high school system. Secondary schools typically follow on from primary schools and lead into vocational and tertiary education. Attendance is compulsory in most countries for students between the ages of 11 and 16. The organisations, buildings, and terminology are more or less unique in each country.[1][2] Contents 1 Levels of education 2 Terminology- descriptions of cohorts 3 Theoretical framework 4 Building design specifications 5 Secondary schools by country 6 See also 7 References 8 External links Levels of education First 'Early levels' of the ISCED 2011 levels of education and comparison with ISCED 1997 Level ISCED 2011 Description Corresponding ISCED 1997 level 0 Early childhood Education (01 Early childhood educational development) Education designed to support early development in preparation for participation in school and society. Programmes designed for children below the age of 3. None 0 Early childhood Education (02 Pre-primary education) Education designed to support early development in preparation for participation in school and society. Programmes designed for children from age 3 to the start of primary education. Level 0: Pre-primary education. 1 Primary education Programmes typically designed to provide students with fundamental skills in reading, writing and mathematics and to establish a solid foundation for learning. Level 1: Primary education or first stage of basic education. 2 Lower secondary education First stage of secondary education building on primary education, typically with a more subject-oriented curriculum. Level 2: Lower secondary education or second stage of basic education 3 Upper secondary education Second/final stage of secondary education preparing for tertiary education or providing skills relevant to employment. Usually with an increased range of subject options and streams. Level 3: Upper secondary education 4 Post-secondary non-tertiary education Programmes providing learning experiences that build on secondary education and prepare for labour market entry or tertiary education. The content is broader than secondary but not as complex as tertiary education. Level 4: Post-secondary non-tertiary education 5 Short-cycle tertiary education Short first tertiary programmes that are typically practically-based, occupationally-specific and prepare for labour market entry. These programmes may also provide a pathway to other tertiary programmes. Level 5B: First stage of tertiary education: typically shorter, more practical/technical/occupationally specific programmes leading to professional qualifications. [3] Terminology- descriptions of cohorts Within the English speaking world, there are three widely used systems to describe the age of the child. The first is the 'equivalent ages', then countries that base their education systems on the 'English model' use one of two methods to identify the year group, while countries that base their systems on the 'American K-12 model' refer to their year groups as 'grades'. This terminology extends into research literature. Below is a convenient comparison [4] Equivalent ages 4-5 5-6 6-7 7-8 8-9 9-10 10-11 USA (grades) Pre-K K 1 2 3 4 5 England (forms) Reception Infants Top infants Junior 1 Junior 2 Junior 3 Junior 4 England (year) R 1 2 3 4 5 6 ISCED level 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 [4] Equivalent ages 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17 17-18 USA (grades) 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 USA (nicknames) Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior England (forms) First Second Third Fourth Fifth Lower Sixth Upper Sixth England (year) 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ISCED level 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 [4] Theoretical framework High school in Bratislava, Slovakia (Gamča) School building design does not happen in isolation. The building (or school campus) needs to accommodate: Curriculum content Teaching methods Costs Education within the political framework Use of school building (also in the community setting) Constraints imposed by the site Design philosophy Each country will have a different education system and priorities. [5] Schools need to accommodate students, staff, storage, mechanical and electrical systems, storage, support staff, ancillary staff and administration. The number of rooms required can be determined from the predicted roll of the school and the area needed. According to standards used in the United Kingdom, a general classroom for 30 students needs to be 55 m², or more generously 62 m². A general art room for 30 students needs to be 83 m², but 104 m² for 3D textile work. A drama studio or a specialist science laboratory for 30 needs to be 90 m². Examples are given on how this can be configured for a 1,200 place secondary (practical specialism).[6] and 1,850 place secondary school.[7] Building design specifications The first taxpayer-funded public school in the United States was in Dedham. The building providing the education has to fulfil the needs of: The students, the teachers, the non-teaching support staff, the administrators and the community. It has to meet general government building guidelines, health requirements, minimal functional requirements for classrooms, toilets and showers, electricity and services, preparation and storage of textbooks and basic teaching aids. [8] An optimum secondary school will meet the minimum conditions and will have : adequately-sized classrooms; specialised teaching spaces; a staff preparation room; an administration block; multipurpose classrooms; a general purpose school hall; laboratories for science, technology, mathematics and life sciences, as may be required; adequate equipment; a library or library stocks that are regularly renewed; and computer rooms or media centres.[8] Government accountants having read the advice then publish minimum guidelines on schools. These enable environmental modelling and establishing building costs. Future design plans are audited to ensure that these standards are met but not exceeded. Government ministries continue to press for the 'minimum' space and cost standards to be reduced. The UK government published this downwardly revised space formula in 2014. It said the floor area should be 1050m² (+ 350m² if there is a sixth form) + 6.3m²/pupil place for 11- to 16-year-olds + 7m²/pupil place for post-16s. The external finishes were to be downgraded to meet a build cost of £1113/m². [9] Secondary schools by country Main article: List of secondary education systems by country A secondary school, locally may be called high school or senior high school. In some countries there are two phases to secondary education (ISCED 2) and (ISCED 3), here the junior high school, intermediate school, lower secondary school, or middle school occurs between the primary school (ISCED 1) and high school. Names for secondary schools by country Argentina: secundaria or polimodal, escuela secundaria Australia: high school, secondary college Austria: gymnasium (Ober- & Unterstufe), Hauptschule, Höhere Bundeslehranstalt (HBLA), Höhere Technische Lehranstalt (HTL) Azerbaijan: orta məktəb Bahamas, The: junior high (grades 7–9), senior high (grades 10–12) Belgium: lagere school/école primaire, secundair onderwijs/école secondaire, humaniora/humanités Bolivia: educación primaria superior (grades 6–8) and educación secundaria, (grades 9–12) Bosnia and Herzegovina: srednja škola (literally middle school), gimnazija (gymnasium) Brazil: ensino médio (officially), segundo grau (formerly) Brunei: mostly sekolah menengah (English translation: secondary school), a few maktab (English translation: college) Bulgaria: cредно образование (grades 8–12) Canada: High school, junior high or middle school, secondary school, école secondaire, lycée, collegiate institute, polyvalente Chile: enseñanza media China: zhong xue (中学; literally, middle school), consisting of chu zhong (初中; literally beginning middle) from grades 7 to 9 and gao zhong (高中; literally high middle) from grades 10 to 12 Colombia: bachillerato, segunda enseñanza (literally second learning) Croatia: srednja škola (literally middle school), gimnazija (gymnasium) Cyprus: Γυμνάσιο (gymnasium), Ενιαίο Λύκειο (Lyceum) Czech Republic: střední škola (literally middle school), gymnázium (gymnasium), střední odborné učiliště Denmark: gymnasium Dominican Republic: nivel medio, bachillerato Egypt: Thanawya Amma (ثانوية عامة), (public secondary certificate) Estonia: upper secondary school, gymnasium, Lyceum Finland: lukio (Finn.) gymnasium (Swed.) France: collège (junior), lycée (senior) Germany: Gymnasium, Gesamtschule, Realschule, Hauptschule, Fachoberschule Greece: Γυμνάσιο (3 years) (gymnasium), Γενικό Λύκειο (3 years) (~1996, 2006~present), Ενιαίο Λύκειο (3 years), (1997~2006) (lyceum) Hong Kong: Secondary school (中學) Hungary: gimnázium (grammar school), középiskola (comprehensive school, lit. "middle-school"), szakközépiskola (vocational secondary school, lit. "specified middle-school") Iceland: framhaldsskóli (menntaskóli, iðnskóli, fjölbrautaskóli) from 11-13 Grade. You go first in 1 - 10 Grade then you change the school to Menntaskóla and take 3 years (11-13 Grade). But you can also take it 4 years. India: secondary school, higher secondary school Indonesia: sekolah menengah atas (SMA) (lit. "upper middle school"), sekolah menengah pertama (SMP) (lit. "first middle school"), sekolah menengah kejuruan (SMK) (vocational school, lit. "middle vocational school") Ireland: Meánscoil or Secondary School Italy: scuola secondaria di primo grado (3 years) + scuola secondaria di secondo grado (5 years): Liceo, Istituto Tecnico and professionale (3–4 years) Japan: chūgakkō (中学校; literally middle school), kōtōgakkō (高等学校; literally high school), chūtōkyōikugakkō (中等教育学校; Secondary School) – In the pre-Meiji educational system, the equivalent was called "chūsei" South Korea: 중등교육 (joongdeung gyoyook; literally middle education), comprising 중학교 (joonghakkyo; grades 7–9, though referred to as "middle school grades 1–3") and 고등학교 (godeunghakkyo; grades 10–12, though referred to as "high school grades 1–3") Latvia: vidusskola (literally middle school) Liechtenstein: gymnasium Lithuania: vidurinė mokykla (literally middle school), gimnazija (gymnasium), licėjus (lyceum) Malaysia: secondary school or sekolah menengah, sometimes high school is used Malta: skola sekondarja or secondary school Mexico: educación secundaria y preparatoria Mongolia: бүрэн дунд сургууль Netherlands: middelbare school or voortgezet onderwijs New Zealand: high school, college or secondary school Norway: videregående skole Pakistan: secondary school, higher secondary school Paraguay: educación media Peru: educación secundaria or escuela secundaria Philippines: high school or mataas na paaralan Poland: gimnazjum (grades 7–9), liceum (grades 10–12) Portugal: 2º Ciclo do Ensino Básico (5th and 6th grades), 3º Ciclo do Ensino Básico (7th to 9th grades), and Ensino Secundário, Liceu (10th to 12th grades) Romania: gimnaziu (grades 5–8), liceu (grades 9–12) Russia: средняя школа (literally middle school) Serbia: gymnasium (4 years), professional schools (4 years), vocational schools (3 or 4 years) Spain: educación secundaria, composed of two cycles: E.S.O. (Educación Secundaria Obligatoria, compulsory secondary education, 4 years, 7th to 10th grade) and bachillerato (non-compulsory secondary education, 2 years, 11th and 12th grade); formerly, primary education comprised up to the 8th grade and the secondary education was composed of two non-compulsory cycles: B.U.P. (Bachillerato Unificado Polivalente, 3 years, 9th to 11th grade) and C.O.U. (Curso de Orientación Universitaria, 1 year, 12th grade) Sweden: gymnasium Switzerland: gymnasium, secondary school, collège or lycée Taiwan: Junior High School (國民中學), Senior High School (高級中學), Vocational High School (高級職業中學), Military School (軍校), and Complete High School (完全中學). Thailand: mạṭhymṣ̄ụks̄ʹā (มัธยมศึกษา; ilt. "Secondary education") Turkey: Lise Ukraine: середня освіта (transliteration: serednya osvita) United Kingdom: Secondary School (May be referred to as High School) United States: High school (North America) (usually grades 9–12 but sometimes 10–12, it is also called senior high school) is always considered secondary education; junior high school or intermediate school or middle school (6–8, 7–8, 6–9, 7–9, or other variations) are sometimes considered secondary education. Uruguay: Liceo or Secundaria (3 years of compulsory education: Ciclo Básico; and 3 years of specialization: Bachillerato Diversificado, into: Humanities (Law or Economics), Biology (Medicine or Agronomy), Science (Engineering or Architecture), and Art Venezuela: bachillerato Vietnam: Trung học cơ sở (lit. basis middle school) Trung học phổ thông (lit. "popular middle school") South Korea: 고등학교 (lit. trans. from the American term "high school") (equiv. to America's 10th-12th grades)[citation needed] See also List of schools by country Secondary education Tertiary education Diploma icon.pngEducation portal School.svgSchools portal References "International Standard Classification of EducationI S C E D 1997". www.unesco.org. Iwamoto, Wataru (2005). "Towards a Convergence of Knowledge Acquisition and Skills Development" (PDF). uis.unesco.org. UNESCO. Retrieved 11 March 2017. (PDF) http://uis.unesco.org/sites/default/files/documents/international-standard-class ification-of-education-isced-2011-en.pdf. Retrieved 25 December 2017. Missing or empty |title= (help) Ward, Ken. "British and American Systems (Grades)". trans4mind.com. Retrieved 30 March 2017. Liew Kok-Pun, Michael (1981). "Design of secondary schools:Singapore a case study" (PDF). Educational Building reports. Voume 17: UNESCO. p. 37. Retrieved 3 April 2017. "Baseline designs: 1,200 place secondary (practical specialism) - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. GOV.UK. Retrieved 4 April 2017. "Baseline design: 1,850 place secondary school - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. gov.uk. Retrieved 4 April 2017. "Guidelines relating to planning for public school infrastructure". Department of Basic Education, Republic of South Africa. 2012. Retrieved 3 April 2017. "Baseline designs for schools: guidance - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. Education Funding Agency. 11 March 2014. Retrieved 3 April 2017. External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to High schools and secondary schools. Australian CensusAtSchool (Australia) Canadian Education Statistics Council (CESC) (United States) Office for National Statistics (ONS) (United Kingdom) BB103_Area_Guidelines_for_Mainstream_Schools (2014) UK National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) (United States) OECD Standardised designs (2011) [show] v t e Secondary education by country [show] v t e School types [show] v t e Stages of formal education Authority control GND: 4189521-6 Categories: Secondary educationHigh schools and secondary schoolsSchool terminologySchool typesEducational stagesHigh schools Navigation menu Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog inArticleTalkReadEditView historySearch Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item Cite this page Print/export Create a book Download as PDF Printable version In other projects Wikimedia Commons Wikiquote Languages العربية বাংলা Deutsch Bahasa Indonesia Basa Jawa 日本語 Português اردو 中文 33 more Edit links This page was last edited on 9 April 2018, at 12:51. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Privacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimersContact WikipediaDevelopersCookie statementMobile viewEnable previews

    Posted by Danon on 16 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Danon

    sorry guys alot of info

    Posted by Danon on 16 Apr 2018

  • [1] [0]
    Tynewydd

    Of course! No brainer!

    Posted by Tynewydd on 16 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Rosemary

    Absolutely very important high school and years 11 and 12 and talk to a careere`s officer who will help you in deciding what you should focus on for a good future in life,

    Posted by Rosemary on 16 Apr 2018

  • [0] [0]
    Danon

    yes then you can get a good job

    Posted by Danon on 16 Apr 2018

  • [2] [0]
    Elizabeth

    I think it depends on the individual. Some teenagers are academic minded, some are more artistic, some would benefit from a trade apprenticeship.

    Posted by Elizabeth on 16 Apr 2018

  • [2] [0]
    Jannette

    I believe every child deserves an education,encourage the child to complete their high school years.Its not just about grades,better jobs its also about character,learning to make better choices,not rushing into adult life.Its stepping stones to maturity about your life.

    Posted by Jannette on 16 Apr 2018

  • [2] [0]
    graykath

    From my own experiences, at 17 years, only your elemental learning is complete. Your future learning should be directed into your career of choice, which may involve further studies, and be supported by employment, hopefully in the industry of your choice.

    Posted by graykath on 16 Apr 2018

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