Is It Wrong to Climb Uluru?


Climbing Uluru has been a controversial issue for a number of years and will be officially banned at the end of the year. However, people still want to climb Uluru. For most people Uluru is seen as a landmark of Australia but for the local indigenous community, Uluru is a sacred site. It’s also a pretty treacherous climb, 37 people have died on the route since it opened in the 1950’s. What do you think LiveTribers, is it wrong to climb Uluru? Or do you think it’s a good way to bring tourists to the area?  

Posted by on 27 May 2019

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  • [0] [0]
    Monica

    yes not only for cultural reasons but for preservation as well

    Posted by Monica on 05 Jul 2019

  • [0] [0]
    Elvis

    yes its wrong to climb it

    Posted by Elvis on 23 Jun 2019

  • [2] [0]
    Gary

    Would it be wrong to climb all over say the graves & memorials of our A.N.Z.A.C.s.respect shouldn't be about right or wrong. Comes down to respect or no respect.we all no it's wrong&disrespectfull

    Posted by Gary on 08 Jun 2019

  • [1] [1]
    Danon2019

    Only the owners should be allowed. If not you should ask permission.

    Posted by Danon2019 on 03 Jun 2019

  • [2] [1]
    KevinW

    I don't see climbing Uluru as "wrong", but it shows disrespect for the landowners expressed wishes. It is also dangerous. More than fifty people have died on the climb (falls, heart attacks etc). This death toll is a big burden for the owners who feel sadness for the deceased and their families. When I visited 6 years ago, I decided to not climb. I did the walk around the base, and refrained from photographing the sacred sites.

    Posted by KevinW on 02 Jun 2019

  • [1] [1]
    Joelene

    No it is a sacrat spot as told from the elders there is a sprit berryed in the ground and the sprit rose the ground into what we know as uluru. Respect no to climb on the rock

    Posted by Joelene on 02 Jun 2019

  • [1] [0]
    2Daffy

    A fee to climb does sound like a good idea in principle. Miney back intonthe community and all. How about if someone wanted to climb they first need to hear from the indigenous people the reasons for it being considered sacred and the stories that go with those reasons. Then it's a case of the climbers conscious and morals if they wish to proceed.

    Posted by 2Daffy on 02 Jun 2019

  • [0] [0]
    Gary

    You don't have to let people climb on or over ulluru to sell this Marvell. Just like all of us.that have made money from this land we share.we have had.to diversify our way of making money. Whether it's due to a change in respect or.due.to weather changes.or other issues.with an asset as.rare as ULLURU there are many way's to earn monies from this remarkable peace of land. Surely people would rather say a glamour indigenous photo. A photo so original.standing there in the fore-ground is "ULLURU".with natural lightning strikes borders with traditional dot work painted onto your photo.THAT.I WOULD BUY$.GARY.

    Posted by Gary on 08 Jun 2019

  • [1] [2]
    WiseOldOwl

    I'm not sure there's a difference between Australians and Aboriginals these days. We're all Australians, now. If it's a tourist destination, why not let people climb it? The Aboriginals are happy to sell their boomerangs and other tribal/cultural trinkets. The Aboriginals should in fact be encouraging people to visit and climb the rock, which is the entire reason people go to the Northern Territory in the first place. See the nose-dive the NT Tourism industry takes once the banning takes place. You could easily say all of Australia is sacred. I know The Grampians was a campsite for Aboriginals also, though people climb The Pinnacle all the time. Time for everyone to understand the motivations of tourists if there is to continue to be a tourism industry in Australia.

    Posted by WiseOldOwl on 01 Jun 2019

  • [0] [0]
    Gary

    Teach the traditional owners to fly. Then people could get some original shots of ULLURU as a whole. Not just a photo from one of 4-5 sides at certain times.It could be seen and photographed from wherever your pilots knowledge places you. Better training more interesting.the flight interesting flight. Returning people's.who wouldn't love an "ULLURU". ONE OF PEICE OF ART DEPICTING ONE OF THOUSANDS OF ORIGINAL POSSES AVAILABLE ONLY FROM YOUR OWN

    Posted by Gary on 08 Jun 2019

  • [1] [1]
    robbur

    Ask an Aboriginal if he feels included in Australian society. You've made it all about economics and nothing about respecting an ancient people's sacred site.

    Posted by robbur on 03 Jun 2019

  • [0] [0]
    JaXiN

    I must say, WOW, to every point you tried to make, firstly there will always be a vast difference between the Australian and Aboriginal Indigenous cultures, an Obvious difference "Respect" for the land, it's people and a strong spiritual aspect. Australia has sold more than 1/3 of the country to China. The only people I see sell boomerangs and 'trinkets' are asians at the markets. More importantly there are incredibly so many areas within Australia to use for tourism, but even sadly Australians are travelling overseas without realizing what they have right under there own feet. Money money money.

    Posted by JaXiN on 03 Jun 2019

  • [1] [3]
    gary49

    I visited about 20 years ago - I did not climb but was tempted - but did not because of health problems. I think there are becoming too many sacred sites around Australia - its time we took Australia back.

    Posted by gary49 on 31 May 2019

  • [0] [0]
    JaXiN

    How many sacred sites have you even come across?? 2 max! Haha. I like your "it's time we took Australia back". You never lost it, you just sold to China, what you stole! You gave it away

    Posted by JaXiN on 03 Jun 2019

  • [4] [1]
    Michael

    Yes, we need to respect those who hold this icon as a sacred item. One can enjot the beauty, the grandeur and that overawing feeling by just being there!

    Posted by Michael on 31 May 2019

  • [2] [1]
    Annette

    I climbed Uluru way back in the late 1960's. The first part was difficult but there was a hand rail to hang onto on the way up. Once past the hand rail however, it was very enjoyable and a not to difficult climb. The view from the top was spectacular as one could see far across that beautiful red land. When the climb was completed we all received a badge saying "I climbed Ayres Rock." I would hate to have missed out on that experience. I respect the aboriginal race and their culture but I think it's a shame to ban people from climbing the rock. It's such a beautiful part of the Australian culture. Yes, there have been tragedies, with people falling and losing their lives. Maybe they were running or somehow not paying attention. All I can say is that I was with a tour group and it was very safe. Not one person was in danger at any stage of the climb. I have never forgotten the experience of climbing Uluru, as it is now named, visiting the Olga's and camping under the stars overnight.

    Posted by Annette on 31 May 2019

  • [3] [1]
    ian

    Why not share the rock, it is public, They share the dole

    Posted by ian on 31 May 2019

  • [0] [1]
    robbur

    My, you are cynical. You have no understanding of what we took from indigenous people. Captain Cook described the natives of Arnhem Land as living "better than the kings of Europe" . They did not have the necessities of life as Europeans knew it, but they did not have to work hard day in day out to keep body and soul together either. We took the hunting places away and corralled them onto missions and made them feel lesser beings. We owe them big time.

    Posted by robbur on 03 Jun 2019

  • [0] [1]
    Thilangika Kaluwewe

    I recently visited Uluru. Respecting traditional owners' views I did not climb Uluru. I walked around while enjoying the sight of our Australian Icon. Is tourist attraction to Uluru purely based on the fact 'being able to climb or not being able to climb"? If we take any explorer/adventurer would love to climb a challenging landscape which seems okay similar to Kings Canyon Rim Walk ( Which is open to public yet a challenging and an enjoyable achievement. Yet certain reserved areas such as Uluru on my point of view let it be as it is. Climbing better be restricted. If public climbing is allowed it only should be a designated area. In order to promote it as an Australian Iconic Land Mark and a tourist attraction; more research and discussion is needed with traditional people too because both Uluru and Traditional People are Australian too. We all Australians got an obligation to look after both Uluru and some traditional cultural values. Composition of the rock, geography and topography are areas of interest for further research and effects of possible human and industrial damage at Uluru and surrounding areas are more important at this point of discussion than using '" Climbing Uluru" as a tourist attraction. At the moment there is not enough reasons except for ' respecting aboriginal people - Australians' why it is essential to ban "Uluru Climb". As a world heritage site if we all Australians can develop more exploration tracks and other climbs where Uluru's beauty can be observed from a closer distance it will be more attractive for tourists and other local and international visiting groups.

    Posted by Thilangika Kaluwewe on 31 May 2019

  • [3] [1]
    Jerrod

    All Australians should be able to climb this rock its ours

    Posted by Jerrod on 31 May 2019

  • [3] [1]
    Blank Jim

    The Rock belongs to all Australians. For one mob to ban climbing it is just not right.

    Posted by Blank Jim on 30 May 2019

  • [0] [4]
    Yo pinion

    It is a sacred place. Do we let people clamber on top of the roof of churches or synagogues or mosques? do we let people trample all over things we value? For goodness sake, it is not like there are no other spaces upon which to climb. Have some basic respect, decency and consideration and stay off Uluru, it is the least we can do considering the damage done to this country.

    Posted by Yo pinion on 30 May 2019

  • [0] [1]
    WiseOldOwl

    You do realise that Aboriginals used to set fire to all brush land at whim to hunt game, don't you? Sure, it did also open some seed pods that required fire also such as wattles, though why do you think Australia is so denuded in comparison to other continents? 100,000 years of burning bush-land in 40+ degree heat and our plants being oil-based with eucalyptus will do that. With no fire-fighters, they burned down entire forests for thousands of miles... Considering the damage done? Sustainability? OK, I've considered it. People always talk about how cultures lived in total harmony with nature in some forgotten time, when the reality is, the Aboriginals didn't really... the only reason they were at least "more harmonious" was lack of significant population. I think it's a case of "the grass is always greener on the other side" to be honest. Get a 25-million person population of Aboriginals and how "sustainable" would they be in reality? We all need to eat and it's copulation in extremis that causes issues regarding sustainability, though of course it's everyone's right to have 10 kids if they want, and apparently my right to have to pay baby bonuses to help someone take care of their kid... last time I checked, I wasn't involved in the act to create their kid, so why should I pay for it? Too many babies = too many mouths to feed = destruction of the land through unsustainable practices to feed the masses. Anyone not reached that conclusion yet? So we need to clear more grazing land, we need more cattle, battery hens, etc. and we no longer farm the native animals, we introduce species. Convexly, in terms of sustainability, then we screw the farmers through giant corporations for small margins for which the farmers can't sustain ongoing financial obligations, so ultimately we're creating a society that's unsustainable based on population growth and will eventually starve. You want to talk about global warming? We'll all be dead from starvation well before then. No trees = No oxygen = no air = no humans. All of the so-called "Greenies" still eat, they still build houses out of wood and mined metals, they still drive cars, wear clothes and leather shoes. Not sure where all the supplies comes from? Maybe they need to try to have 5 less kids per household instead and walk to the local school which has solar panels and lighting. In terms of context, we're talking about a rock here. It's not a house, not a church, was never "lived in" except for habitation of caves, and it's PUBLIC PROPERTY owned by National Parks, not by a minority group of people. The biggest issue these days is extensive support of minority groups to the exclusion of common sense. Let's be clear. The people you're talking about and trying to appease are long-dead. The "sacred sites" you're referring to are not Aboriginal, they're Australian and part of a greater heritage that belongs to all Australians. If Australia decided to let people climb the rock, then that's it. No more grumbling from the shadows from a group of people saying they're of a different race. They're Australians. The more you pander to a minority group, the more extortionate the demands become. Why do terrorists attack things? Publicity... it promotes their cause. How is it any different to Aboriginals wanting a separate cultural identity? Again, the point is, we are all Australians. What do you think would happen if I was Greek and decided to go back to Sparta or Macedonia and started saying that "This is Spartan (or Macedonian) land, Greeks get out"? Let bygones be bygones. Wonder why Palestine and Israel are still fighting after 5,500 years? Because a father gave his two sons the same block of land and told them to share it... Why did World War I start? Because Royal families had a bit of a domestic and took sides, creating numerous different secret alliances, then there was an assassination. The English Monarchy are in fact related to just about every other Royal family in Europe. They were in fact originally German by the way (Saxe-Coburg and Gotha don't sound very English, does it now?). Why do you think most European countries are so small? You guessed it, minority groups fragment over time. There are wars immemorial that can tell the same story of an invading population subjugating a population which were then ultimately blended together as a single population, so what's different in this regard with the people once called "Aboriginal"? Are there still Saxons, Celts and Normans running around France and the UK saying that people should honour their ancestral sites? From memory, one of the King Richard's was found buried under a car-park in the middle of London... If there is to be a culture named "Aboriginal", when are we going to see more Aboriginal people in Parliament? Like Fiji, when is the Great Council of Elders going to be formed that then convey their wishes to the Parliament via a representative where they can assist in creating policy for not only one sacred site, but for all of them, to the benefit of all cultures in Australia and not just their own? If a group called the "Aboriginals" want representation and a seat at the Adults table, then they can form a party and use the electoral system to contribute to change and put their points forward for policy consideration. Look at Eddie Mabo. He felt strongly enough about it to actually do something, not just sit around a fire and talk rubbish. Even if we had 100,000 people climb all over the rock, in 10,000 years, it will still be there and point of fact is, tourism money coming into the NT is a vast proponent of what supports the communities there. You do also realise that the "cave paintings" in most cases were probably bored teenagers much like today's bored teenagers that hid from their parents to get blotto and drew on the walls. Sure, they're wonderful, though so is graffiti that many people hated and the government removed continually until they realised there was some dollars to be made from it. When I was a teenager, kids got arrested for graffiti. These days, 30 years on, now it's socially accepted and people come to Melbourne to look at the fantastic graffiti. Guess my friends and I didn't need to cop all those beatings from the Police and get chased through train yards at night, since this "art form" is now considered a marketable commodity for the tourism industry... We have elevated the status of cave paintings to "ancestral depictions" and romanticize these things, though in reality how do you know that some of these cave painting areas weren't the local lavatory where they'd get their scribble pad out and go to the toilet (i.e. a wall)? I'm not saying there shouldn't be respect for the ancestors of any culture or of their ways, though I want you to think about what the ancestors of those cultures would have thought of the romanticization of their drawings. They'd probably laugh and in reality say, "I was too busy trying to feed the kids. I just drew on the wall and told the kids a story one night by the fire so they'd bloody go to sleep because I was tired"... I think this is a First World problem... When you have to go out and hunt all day to put food on the table, do you have time to debate decorum? Oh, and to summarize, I'm in fact part-Aboriginal by the way, so whilst people might be thinking "blasphemy", I don't really care... My Great Grandmother had an illegitimate child to an Aboriginal man at the end of the 1800's out in woop-woop (when Gippsland was still a week's ride by horse from Melbourne) and she was sent to a convent. My Mother grew up knowing my Great Grandmother as "Auntie Winnie", even though she was really her Great Grandmother. My Great Grandmother needed to be seen to be distancing herself from her illegitimate child (my Grandfather) and therefore couldn't keep the honorific of being the mother of the child... If you want me to take the Aboriginal route and claim ancestral ownership, then I don't have a problem with people walking on "my rock". Go for it. It's part of my heritage and it's also part of Australia. Send me a cheque! :) Finally, I don't go around saying "I'm Aboriginal", nor do I look Aboriginal, either. I'm not Adam Goode pretending to throw spears at people at football games and creating divisions and simply put, I look at myself as "Australian", not "Aboriginal". Everyone would be far better off and far more at one with nature if they stopped creating divisions and giving themselves titles to show their differences and continually seeking the limelight. You wanted someone's take on it that was part of the result of the "Stolen Generations"? Well, there, you have it. I think "Whiteman care more about this than Blackfella"... We all bleed red last time I checked and it doesn't say "Aboriginal" on my passport.

    Posted by WiseOldOwl on 01 Jun 2019

  • [0] [1]
    coaster

    Years ago when they changed the name from Ayres Rock to Uluru and the indigenous took ownership of the area I am sure they said that the people will still be able to climb the rock, view the rock etc. and in no way hinder these activities. Now it has come to pass that the area is becoming closed to other people. I have been there although I did not climb the rock. I think respect must be adhered to however for the indigenous beliefs. I think disrespect for the land and other people though works both ways. There are some indigenous people who disrespect the land and leave filth so lets not just point the finger at other cultures including Australians. I feel that they could hire more indigenous people as guides as they already have a few and educate the tourists who want to view this wonder of the world. This way I am sure there would be no disrespect by a few idiots.

    Posted by coaster on 30 May 2019

  • [0] [2]
    robbur

    If the traditional owners of Uluru object to people climbing and defecating (as some do) on Uluru, we should respect their beliefs. I'm sure no-one would leave a disgusting mess at St Peters in Rome.

    Posted by robbur on 30 May 2019

  • [2] [2]
    carlton

    Like so many other natural and splendid wonders, let your eyes enjoy the spectacle. Or walk around it to appreciate the enormity and beauty, Why do you need to walk over it for the simple sake of saying "I've done it!"

    Posted by carlton on 30 May 2019

  • [1] [2]
    intrepidarts

    It's not wrong but the aboriginal people that belong to.the land holding have voiced their concerns as a whole and have eliminated the ability to climb on a sacred site - until they choose an alternative their wishes should be respected..

    Posted by intrepidarts on 29 May 2019

  • [2] [3]
    Carolynn

    People should be able to share in the natural wonders that our earth provides as long as they don’t damage it. May need some guides to keep people on the safest path. Same as the barrier reef. Go visit it belongs to us all but don’t damage the coral. The rock Uluru is pretty hardy. I think we as Australians should visit and appreciate it. I climbed it years ago and it is amazing to stand on the top. One feels very connected with our land. It can only be positive to centre yourself in the land we are born or the land you have adopted for the newcomers.

    Posted by Carolynn on 29 May 2019

  • [2] [1]
    robbur

    Uluru has suffered damaged from climbers and if you were as connected with the land as the traditional owners are, you would respect their sacred places.

    Posted by robbur on 30 May 2019

  • [3] [5]
    musicveg

    100% wrong, we need to respect Indigenous culture, it is the least we can do after over 200 years of destroying their culture. Those who still want to climb are just plain selfish and disrespectful and that in the Indigenous culture it is actually bad luck to.

    Posted by musicveg on 29 May 2019

  • [1] [5]
    froghollow

    It is only wrong if you believe it to be wrong. I climbed it a few years ago and really enjoyed the experience. The view from the top is awesome but I agree with Katrina that it should be for a fee to benefit the traditional owners.

    Posted by froghollow on 28 May 2019

  • [0] [0]
    coaster

    If I remember rightly you had to pay an entrance fee to the indigenous after it was handed over years ago so presume this is still in place.

    Posted by coaster on 04 Aug 2019

  • [1] [0]
    robbur

    On that basis, we could do anything we choose, including murder.

    Posted by robbur on 30 May 2019

  • [4] [4]
    Graeme

    No it is not wrong, just another hill to climb, belongs to all Australians

    Posted by Graeme on 28 May 2019

  • [2] [4]
    Katrina

    I think it should be allowed, but under specific conditions, such as a paid for guided tour from the traditional owners of that land, and all funds raised go into a fund to be used for the benefit of those traditional land owners. Uluru does belong to the traditional owners, it was the europeans who decided that it was land to be claimed on their behalf, so I do agree that Uluru belongs to the traditional land owners, and I believe that they should have the right to make decisions, and hopefully ones that benefit all. For example, allowing tourists, but under their guidelines and rules. If anyone could get a group of tourists to the top of Uluru safely it would be those who know it best.

    Posted by Katrina on 28 May 2019

  • [4] [0]
    musicveg

    The traditional owners will not climb it, so how can they take tourists up, and they already benefit (to some extent) on taking tourists around the bottom of it explaining the culture.

    Posted by musicveg on 29 May 2019

  • [5] [3]
    Peter

    It's there to share like the sun and moon and stars doesn't belong to anyone

    Posted by Peter on 27 May 2019

  • [1] [3]
    robbur

    I'd like to share your house, your backyard and your car. When can I drop in?

    Posted by robbur on 30 May 2019

  • [0] [0]
    ere

    Drop in and share their house backyard and car when you pay the mortgage on the house and rego for their car. I'm sure you will be welcome. The rock is free, no one paid for it, no one owns it. It's a natural phenomenon that doesn't belong to anybody and anyone who wants to should be free to explore or climb it. It's just another tourist attraction.

    Posted by ere on 04 Jun 2019

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